Posts Tagged ‘Peak end’

The Peak End Rule – how do you leave your customers on a high?

June 25, 2014

Neil ShackletonHave you ever watched a film and as it plays find yourself thinking, “wow, what an amazing special effect, I wonder how they did that” or “NO, don’t go in the house, he’s in there with a knife!” Did you know that Hollywood craft every single moment of their movies to an exact formula, that every incident, special effect, twist in the tale is laid out to the exact same page number, every time? Check out http://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Hollywood-Blockbuster

Those that are genius at it like Steven Spielberg are able to craft an amazing movie experience with a great ending to leave us exiting the movie theatre on a high. But think about those movies you saw that didn’t have a great ending. What did you say about them when asked…. “it was ok but the ending was rubbish, so don’t bother seeing it!”? Probably 95% was great but that last 5% wasn’t good enough to really win you over, and promote the movie to a friend. Relate that to the customer experience you deliver in your business. Are you carefully crafting that journey for them, ready to send them out on a high, so they promote your business to a friend?

To help you, you need to understand The Peak End Rule and the different ways in which it works. In his book “Thinking Fast and Slow”, Daniel Kahneman says that we judge any experience we have in life by two things – how they were at the peak or peaks of the experience and whether it got better or worse at the end. He calls this The Peak End Rule. If a movie has great special effects or an amazing fight scene but the ending just wasn’t strong enough to leave you on a high, you probably won’t tell your friends to go see it. Relate that to the customer experiences you are creating. You may have a great welcome, ask great questions or offer amazing solutions, but how much thought did you give to how you closed the transaction or in fact, where the customer is on their whole journey with you? Sometimes, by that point we are just happy that we gave the customer what they wanted as we limp out with a “bye, thanks for using us!” but if Spielberg did that, you know what you would say about his movie.

But there’s more. Understanding the journey the person has come on is also important. Daniel also states that if the ending is strong enough, it has the power to wash away any pain the customer may have felt along that journey. “WHAT!” I hear you say. YES. Let me explain…

The Peak End Rule in action

So, a friend of mine went to get a tattoo, his first and rather than choosing something simple as a first, oh no, he had to go big. He chose to have a huge tattoo over his left side. Now they say tattooing over your rib cage is possibly the most painful experience you could ever have whilst getting a tattoo, but that is where he wanted it.

Here is the journey. So the first peak is deciding he is actually going to do it, he is euphoric about it. The second peak is deciding the design he is going to have. It includes an intricate Celtic Knot design, interwoven with pictures of his children. There is a bit of a low when he finds out how much it is going to cost but he hits a peak when he actually raises the money to have it done. So far, three peaks, right?

He is 15 mins into having the tattoo done when he has to ask the artist to stop. He is in so much pain and it is about to continue for the next four and a half hours! During this time he is in agony, he is crying, I think he even called for his mother at one point (which we still tease him about), but here is the surprising twist. The minute it is finished you would think that he would say “never again”, but no. He stands looking at it in the mirror in total awe, turns his body to show the now untouched side and says, “think I will get this side done as well!”. “WHAT!” I hear you shout, “is he insane?” but actually, he just got hit by The Peak End Rule.

Remember, when the ending is strong enough, it does have the power to wash away the pain, which in this case, he had only just experienced. A bit like a mother holding her newly born baby – the pain was worth it. The minute he saw how fabulous the tattoo looked, he was ready for another one.

Let’s put all of this in the context of your customer. Firstly, you have a product you sell, let’s say it’s broadband as that probably resonates with most of us and let’s put it in some simplistic terms to scope the journey.

You just bought a new house – peak
You choose the Broadband provider and you are really happy with the deal and speed you are going to get – peak
The router arrives when it should and service goes live without a hitch – peak
Then one day, the Broadband just won’t work and you can’t figure out why – low

What happens next is often the key deciding factor on how the customer feels about the provider they chose. If the customer calls up and the company is really easy to do business with, then it is a peak for the customer and they are happy to continue. They may even promote your business because they get that it will go wrong sometimes, but you were so great in fixing it and made it so effortless for them, they are happy to stay. Peak

BUT, if you create a difficult experience for them at this point, full of hurdles and broken promises to call back and a total lack of acknowledgement of the pain they are going through, then this is when they want to leave you. You created a poor ending. Get it?

Creating a Peak Ending

You can take The Peak End Rule into any customer interaction you have by ensuring that you leave the customer on a high. It is the way you leave them that will have the lasting effect and to illustrate it, I am going to leave you with a short story I stole from a colleague of mine.

So my colleague orders his groceries online regularly and as usual, a guy brings them to the door and leaves. No big deal, that is what we expect, but one day a different guy turns up. This guy offers to carry the groceries through to the kitchen, passing the young daughter who is trying to learn guitar. On the way out, the delivery guy stops and shows the daughter two great little guitar chords and on the back of a receipt he has in his pocket, writes a visual depiction of the chords so she won’t forget them. WOW, what a way to leave. The daughter is delighted she learned two new chords and my colleague is stunned to say the least. TA DA! The Peak End Rule. Guess what, he tells EVERYONE to get their groceries from that store.

So are you ready for your high after RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK or are you churning out SCREAM 58?

Written by Neil Shackleton, Associate Consultant at Blue Sky

FLEXing your letter writing

December 1, 2011

My passion for changing the nation’s service extends to written responses.  I have spent the past 20 years paying more attention than perhaps the ‘normal’ person to the written responses that come from organisations.  In fact, I have built up quite a portfolio of written communication from some of the more recognised brands – I quite often send emails and write letters to companies I have no connection with, JUST to see how they respond.  I’m mostly curious about whether organisations have managed to translate their ‘tone of voice’ through the letters sent out to their customers.  Sadly, in my experience, very few companies are any good at this.  Mostly what you get is a cut and paste job full of the phrases that lack authenticity, written in anything but plain English and without any attempt at personality or emotional connection.

Here are some you might recognise, all lacking colour, imagination and a personal touch:

‘I can assure you this is not indicative of our usually high standard of customer service…’

‘I was disappointed to learn of your poor experience with our (insert department, product, service)’

‘I hope this clarifies matters and we apologise once again for any inconvenience caused.’

We often get asked to work with letter writing teams as part of broader customer experience programmes and when we do, the teams involved usually feel a sense of liberation, having been freed from the straight jacket of business scripting, minds opened up to being able to write with warmth and personality.  It’s actually really quite easy to write good letters, so, inspired by my most recent addition to the portfolio from Innocent Smoothies (shared below) I thought I would pass on some of our top tips.

Put the Good News up front

How many times have you waded through the lengthy paragraphs of explanation (excuses) in search of the outcome – are you getting your refund/compensation or not? Putting the good news up front allows the customer to get quickly to the outcome and then read on for the explanation if they want it.  It really makes a massive difference to the response – if you are going to give something back, let the customer know sooner rather than later.  I also think the phrase ‘gesture of goodwill’ should be banned whilst we are on the subject of refunds or compensation.  It’s much better to say if it is acknowledgement of having made a mistake, or by way of an apology for having let the customer down.

Use plain English

I don’t know what drives people when writing a business letter to use wordy phrases, many containing words you would never actually say out loud in general conversation.  Why say ‘at the present time’, when you can say ‘now’, or ‘due to the fact that’, instead of ‘because’.  Every time you write a sentence, stop and think – is there a shorter, simpler way to say this?  A quick search for Plain English guides on Google will deliver you hundreds of examples to help you if you get stuck.

Respond to emotion as well as key points

When you review business responses to customer letters, what you mostly see is that the key points and facts are given a response, but the opportunity to acknowledge some of the emotion is missed.  If a customer writes, ‘I was disgusted by the level of service and don’t fob me off with a ridiculous excuse’, you’ve got to respond to that.  Something like, ‘You mentioned how disgusted you were with the service we delivered and my intent with this response is to explain what happened.  I hope it doesn’t read as a fob off, as that is definitely not my intent. (Or something like that).  It makes it much more personal and considered.

FLEX to the customers style

Using the company ‘tone of voice’ will get you so far, but there comes a point when you need to reflect the style of the customer in your response.  If the customer is very specific and detailed, reflect that back in your response.  Look for words or phrases that the customer has used that you can play back in your response and try to find something you can agree with to demonstrate a level of rapport and connection.  The Innocent letter does that brilliantly.

Create a Peak Ending

The way an experience ends impacts our memory of that experience (positively or negatively) more than any other part.  So the ending of a letter is really important.  In my experience, most business letters finish with a bog standard phrase that lacks thought, imagination of connection.  Think carefully about the best way to finish and try to refer back to something personal that the customer has given you in their letter.  If you find yourself using cut and paste at the end, you are probably missing an opportunity to end on a high.

Adapt - Flexing your letter writing - Blue Sky Performance Improvement

As promised, the latest addition to my collection from Innocent Smoothies.  I was intrigued to know if they would stand up to the funky and fun brand image they portray and I was not disappointed.  As an aside, I am not a freaky mother who worries incessantly about my children, I just couldn’t think of anything else to ask!

Here was my letter:

Hi there,

I am writing to check in as to the suitability of innocent smoothies for babies. My littlest won’t let my older two swig their smoothies without wanting some himself and if we don’t let him he goes mental. I know it says only fruit, but I never believe what I read on the packaging. Supermarkets have a habit of lying to customers and I am not keen on putting anything unsuitable into my baby’s diet.

Let me know what you think.

Sally Earnshaw

Here was the reply that I received:

Hello Sally

Thank you for your email – I quite understand that you want to be certain about what goes into your little ones mouths. I feel just the same with my little boy.

However I can assure you that all of our smoothies are made of 100% pure fruit and absolutely nothing else. However this does come with a BUT for children under 36 months and I have given you all of the information below so that you can make up your own mind. I do give smoothies to my little one (18 months) but at least you will have all the information to make an informed decision:

With everything we make we have to err on the side of caution as the last thing we want is for someone to become ill from one of our products.

All our products are 100% natural and as such are dependent on the elements. Some fruits, in this case apples, contain micro bugs that aren’t suitable for younger stomachs. The weather conditions last season meant that our suppliers couldn’t guarantee our usual level of bugs and so to be prudent we’ve put this warning on our fruit tubes to make sure that we look after those little ones, with more sensitive stomachs than us. As I mentioned before, children under 36 months have very sensitive stomachs and there is a stricter limit for them, within food production, about what they should eat. The tubes are completely fine for children over the age of 36 months. Please rest assured that the level of bugs in our fruit tubes is still well within all normal levels and legislation and is nothing to be concerned about.

None of this is said to scare you – but we just want to ensure that our products are doing people good.

I hope this helps to explain things more to you.

All the best,

Jenny

A great example of flexing style, to meet tone and deliver service.

Sally@Bluesky

Sally Earnshaw - Blue Sky Performance Improvement

www.blue-sky.co.uk

Blue Sky Performance Improvement

When it comes to service the USA are the real ‘Superpower’

October 21, 2011

Having recently returned from a trip to the States, it was incredibly obvious to me that the service culture in the US is light-years ahead of the UK – whilst years ago I used to laugh about the ‘have a nice day’ and ‘great to see you today’ type comments that could have been interpreted as false or patronising, I have to admit that this year I found it refreshing to hear positive, friendly statements from almost without exception, every service individual that I met.

Customer Experience - Amercian Flag (Courtesy of http://www.us-flag.net) - Bluesky Performance Improvement

Smiling faces, offers of help, care and attention to my children and always a ‘peak ending’ to make me feel good was a lovely way to do business! Looking at the recent ICS survey results and seeing that in the UK we have moved forward by 1 point – with public sector and utilities lagging well behind the rest, it occurred to me that our attitude to service is completely different.

How do we engage people at all levels in service roles to ‘want’ to make a difference to their customer, not because we are asking them to and not because they have to – but to actually feel good about being nice to customers? Can you imagine a world where your local council tell you to ‘have a magical day’! or who always offer solutions instead of re-visiting the process and why it has to be this way!, well I do believe this paradigm shift can be achieved…….but can it be done before my next holiday…?

Lindsay@Bluesky

Lindsay Terris - Blue Sky Performance Improvement

www.blue-sky.co.uk

Blue Sky Performance Improvement