The six steps to rebuilding trust

October 1, 2013 by

Part Three in a series of three articles on rebuilding organisational trust and drive employee engagement

We come to the third article in the series. Now that we understand the importance and elements of trust, I’d like to share six clear steps to rebuilding it. You’ve been sharing some brilliant trust anecdotes and ideas of your own on our social media presences on Twitter #DoTrust and our LinkedIn page Blue Sky Performance Improvement – so please keep them coming! In the meantime, I want to begin with a story of my own…

website-team-trust-imageUSAA is an American insurance business originally set up to sell insurance solely to service men and women. A few years ago, when a large number of service personnel were off fighting in Afghanistan, USAA decided to send thousands of cheques for car insurance back to their customers abroad. Amazing, yes; but what’s more amazing is that over 2,500 of those cheques were then sent back in turn, from customers who explained that “we just want to know that you’re there.”

Today, that business outstrips every other US financial services business in terms of trust, and has grown to become the biggest insurance business in the States.

Here are my six steps for becoming as trustworthy as USAA:

  • Do the maths

Let’s start with the bottom line. How many of you would buy a car from a dodgy second hand salesman? Or a pension from a company going bust? Customers simply won’t buy from a company they don’t trust.

Trust brings a massive internal saving too. High trust organisations are more efficient. People are honest about their struggles and get the support they need. Tough conversations are had, decisions are made, and meetings actually work.

Internally, costs go down. Externally, sales go up. Here are some startling stats:

  • There are 53% less sick days in organisations with high trust
  • People are 87% less likely to leave an organisation with high trust
  • Out of a survey of 300,000 leaders in over 60 countries, 89% of people put ‘honesty’ as the main trait they wanted to see in their leaders
  • The relationship with your boss is cited as the number one reason people leave an organisation
  • The CIPD quarterly report found that only 36% of employees trust senior leaders and 58% had adopted a ‘not bothered’ attitude for work

In short, trust is not a soft issue. It directly affects your financial success.

  • Engage leaders intellectually and emotionally

The most important element of rebuilding trust in any organisation is to engage senior leaders. They must actively promote trust, or it’s all simply rhetoric.

Use the figures from the analysis above to get them to sit up and listen. Once you’ve engaged them intellectually, dig deeper into some of the feedback generated from focus groups and surveys to stir their emotions too. When they read comments like ‘senior leaders make decisions to serve themselves not the business or the customers’ they start to take the issue personally.

  • Share the raw facts

When working with our clients we use an organisational trust survey alongside trust focus groups in which anyone can get involved. The output from that allows us to break trust down into 13 behaviours and rate an organisation against them.

Part of my job is to sit in board meetings and coach in the moment. One day I was sitting in a meeting when a decision was taken to merge two divisions. This would have a massive impact on employees, so it was decided not share the news until a plan could be formed. As we were walking down the corridor, the director bumped into a member of his team. He then proceeded to outline word for word the decision that had just been made. Neither of them blinked. This was ‘normal’ behaviour, and I needed to help the company face up to what was happening.

Taking a long, hard, honest look at where you are is an essential basis for change.

  • Create role models and evangelists

Knowing something isn’t enough. I know eating chocolate doesn’t do much for my thighs but it doesn’t change my behaviour. Outside help is required.

Start with your senior leaders, using team coaching to truly embed the commitment and skill to create change. What does a truly trustworthy dialogue look like? How do we deal with difficult issues and still retain trust? What do we do for leaders with great character but low competence, or vice versa? Senior teams need to become role models and start communicating the importance of trust at every opportunity.

  • Spread the word, spread the skill

Run trust workshops and start with volunteers. Take them from all over the organisation and mix them up to create your initial champions. No matter what their seniority or role, these people need to start holding others accountable for their behaviour, in a supportive not accusatory way.

There’s a story that gets repeated in Blue Sky quite regularly. When our office manager Charlie first started at the business, we held a meeting to talk about our own trust culture. When I did something which she felt didn’t reflect our values, she called me into the front room and said ‘I want to give you some feedback.”  Despite her nerves, we had a chat that has cemented a now-unshakeable relationship, 14 years on. Basically, act like Charlie.

Don’t sit on your laurels

Finally, use your own trust survey as an on-going KPI. It takes six minutes to complete and it gives you a consistent register of where you rate on character, competence and trust behaviours. If you want to go forward to build a developmental programme, this helps you identify exactly what needs to change.

Don’t forget to let us know your own experiences and thoughts. You can share your own stories on twitter #DoTrust or through our LinkedIn page and of course your own blogs and social presences.

Elke Edwards - Blue Sky Performance Improvement Elkeatbluesky

www.blue-sky.co.uk

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Do you know what trust looks like?

September 25, 2013 by

Part Two in a series of four articles on rebuilding organisational trust and driving employee engagement

Last week, I looked at building your awareness about the low trust behaviours that surround you every day. We’ve had some fantastic conversations starting to build around the topic, so head over to our Twitter page and look for the #DoTrust hashtag or our LinkedIn page to benefit from the stories and tips shared so far!

Please contribute to the conversation as we move onto the next stage in the trust process – breaking trust into manageable chunks.

What do we actually mean by trust?

Trust-Tuesday-email-two-blog-imageWe use the word trust all the time, but it never loses its emotional punch. If someone says they don’t trust you, it hurts. A lot.

I’m a big fan of the Stephen M.R Covey book The Speed of Trust. In it, he discusses how we continually and subconsciously make decisions based on the confidence we have in a person or an organisation. This confidence is made up of character (a person [or organisation’s] intent and integrity) and competence (their capability, skills and track record).

Have a go at the following exercise:

Relax and take a moment to think about somebody you don’t trust. Imagine them in front of you (really try to imagine them; their clothes, their posture, their expression).
Now, think about why you don’t trust this person. Let me ask you four questions:

  • Is it their intent? Do you believe they’re always out for themselves? Or do they play for the bigger team? What motivates their actions? Is it good?
  • Are they straight? Do they do what they say they’re going to do? Do they say one thing to you and another to somebody else? Do they have integrity?
  • Do they have the knowledge and expertise required for their job? The technical, leadership and people skills? Can they make the right decisions?
  • Do they have relevant experience to bring into their current role? Will they be able to tackle unknown problems? Do they have a track record of success?

So what did you discover in going through that process? Is it their character or their competence that results in a lack of trust? Is it both?

We all have people in our lives that we don’t trust – the key question is whether you want to rebuild trust with them. Many of us hate giving those who have hurt us a second chance, but sometimes second chances can have magical results.

If you want a more trustworthy organisation with more engaged employees, you have to behave in a more trustworthy way. You have to commit to building trust on an individual level before you can expect it to scale. And trust is based on our experiences, so common sense tells us that for trust to be changed, behaviours must be changed first. We don’t need to buy sophisticated computer systems. We need to change what we do.

This is both scary and exciting, because it means we’re in control. And the first step in changing behaviour is naming behaviour, which takes a lot of guts.

Stephen M.R Covey talks about the 13 behaviours that build or destroy trust. Let’s highlight a few:

  • Talk straight – and demonstrate respect to your employees and customers alike. Many businesses are afraid of transparency, but it can have an amazing effect. Admitting that you’re in the middle of a change programme and you don’t know what the end’s going to be, or that the CEO is on his way out but you’re recruiting carefully, actually creates more trust and stability, not less.
  • Right wrongs – admit mistakes. Apologise. Demonstrate how you will change. It’s as simple as that. A reclaimed customer is more loyal than one who never had a bad experience in the first place, so it’s not just the right thing to do – it works.
  • Get better – when coaching the board of a very successful company, our team was recently told “whatever you do, don’t tell anyone you’re coaches. Don’t even tell reception.” Why? “Because we can’t let anyone know our exec board are being coached.” Why not? Is getting better wrong? Or is it reassuring and inspiring?
  • Confront reality – does your CEO get to hear the bad news? Does he want to? We recently did a diagnostic on a leadership team and were told to “take out a lot of the bad comments – he won’t be able to take it.” That’s a scary prospect.
  • Clarify expectations – spend time to let people know what is really needed from them. All too often, people come unstuck for the lack of a proper briefing.
  • Practice accountability – consider Jimmy Savile. What about all those people who knew what he was doing and didn’t speak up? Bad people are simply a fact of life, so it’s up to those around them to stand up for what is right.
  • Extend trust – recently, an ex-senior director of AOL let slip that 75% of AOL customers were paying for dial up broadband service, even though AOL offer it for free. They had signed up years ago, when it wasn’t, and nobody had called to explain. This charge accounts for 80% of their profitability. Trust isn’t passive – it has to be earned. Are you proactive in whistleblowing untrustworthiness?

Trust is behaviour. Behaviour is under our control. But do you want to act?

For me it is [as my 10 year old would say] a no-brainer! I remember my Girl Guide motto “It’s your world – change it.” But once you’ve identified what you need to do, how do you make sure it will really work?

Next week, I’ll look at the practical things you can do to rebuild trust in your organisation. Until then, let me know the least and most trustworthy behaviours you see occurring around you every day…

You can share your own stories on twitter #DoTrust or through our LinkedIn page Blue Sky Performance Improvement and of course your own blogs and social presences.

Elke Edwards - Blue Sky Performance ImprovementElke@bluesky

Getting honest about trust

September 17, 2013 by

I recently had lunch with one of our clients, the chairman of a large global bank. He told me a story about a call he recently took from a head hunter, who wanted some advice on his list of potential candidates for the CEO role at a competitor bank.

The client, being a generous man, spent an hour and a half on the phone giving his opinion on the 30 or so candidates. He didn’t personally know all of them, but, in a tight-knit industry, he immediately knew who was an instant write-off and who would be a better fit. What on earth, I asked, could he have conveyed about these top-level execs for this incredibly important role in just a couple of minutes?

 “Well,” he replied, “I basically said whether I trusted them to do the job or not.”

For me, that conversation was a powerful reminder of how many important events in our life occur because of stuff people say about us when we’re not in the room.

Imagine you’re applying for a job in a different part of your organisation. You send an email to your potential new boss. What’s the first thing your potential new boss does? Asks your current boss for their opinion. They’ll probably take more than a couple of minutes, but in that brief conversation they will say whether or not they think you’re right for that job. No matter what comes after, that one initial exchange will have been a key decider in your future career.

The single most important emotion in these conversations and decisions is trust.

The degree of trust people place in us – to get a job done, to support them in a crisis, to show up to lunch on time – influences our lives in ways that are often completely out of our control. Most trust judgements occur without us having any consciousness of them, but they have a profound impact on where we end up.

If you don’t trust your partner, however great your relationship may be on the surface, it will eventually fall apart. If you do trust your friend, you’ll let them get away with an awful lot, because you know they’ll come good in the end. This is just as important in business as it is among friends or family. If you trust your leader, you’ll give them your all, because you know the effort will be reciprocated. If you don’t, you’ll always be trying to protect yourself, afraid that your work will go to waste. And these attitudes directly impact on the performance of the organisation as a whole.

Over the past few years we’ve been inundated with scandals in the press featuring people in senior positions making untrustworthy decisions. This year’s Edelman Global Trust Survey interviewed 31,000 business people across 26 different markets and found that banks and financial services are the least trusted organisations of all. The same negative feedback has been found for leadership; only 38% of people trust what a CEO is saying about their own organisation.

Lack of trust is obviously a huge organisational issue; in fact, I think it is the most important challenge we currently face. So the big question becomes: what can we do about it?

In the meantime I’ll be sharing my own thoughts in three articles, kicking off with what I see as the first essential step, removing your trust blinkers.

Start noticing the unquestioned low trust behaviours that happen within our businesses every day. Immerse yourself, become a trust detective. Begin by spotting how common, and commonly accepted, low trust behaviours are. Here are my suggestions for some good places to look:

  • Corridor conversations – It’s amazing how often there’s silent consensus ‘in the room’, followed by long and angry dissections outside the room with zero accountability or action.
  • Gossiping – We all hate the thought of people whispering behind our back. But be honest: How many times have you heard or participated in a good gossip?
  • Self-serving decisions – People may claim that their decision is the best thing for the company, but their true motives are crystal clear.
  • Do as I say, not as I do – My personal bugbear! Leaders talking the talk but failing to walk the walk are all too common. This is a trait of many organisations that score ‘superficial’ on the trust barometer, where leadership is a title, not a behaviour.
  • Incompetent leaders – How many of today’s leaders lack either the technical competence or the people skills to do what is expected of them? If you have a culture of high trust with continual feedback and development, it’s not such a problem. But in low trust organisations people work around their incompetence in a miasma of fear
  • Meeting mania – Low trust manifests in general ineffectiveness. Too many people are involved in decisions for fear of ‘leaving someone out’. Decisions are constantly deferred in case they are wrong. Everyone fights their own corner. Inertia ensues.
  • Low accountability – Blaming others, not owning up to mistakes, not holding poor performance to account, silos, inter-department warring…you know the drill.

So, now you’re seeing the trust issues clearly, what can you do?

Look out for the second article in our trust series, coming next week. In the meantime, I look forward to hearing your own thoughts on how to spot the trust underbelly in your organisation…

You can share your own stories on twitter #DoTrust or through our LinkedIn group Blue Sky Performance Improvement and of course your own blogs and social presences.

Elke Edwards - Blue Sky Performance Improvement Elke@BlueSky

I just gave someone a listening to.

September 12, 2013 by

Listening-Dog-BlueI am a mere mortal. I know this because I have to take my car for its annual MOT. (That’s a legally required road safety check here in the UK for more mature vehicles. More important people have somebody do this for them. Or have new cars.)

The thing is, it took me a while to get it sorted out because I ended up giving the lady at the garage a damn good listening to.

In brief: Her husband is fifty years young next year so they are going to New Zealand where they have friends. They are going to rent a motorcycle. He already has a Honda Fireblade and she sometimes falls asleep when she is pillion. Their kids – which they had young – are at university and the boyfriends have basically moved in. The kids each have a Vauxhall car. They have almost paid off the mortgage and thanks to a canny endowment purchase.

This happens to me a lot. I meet random folk and they download.

My family roll their eyes when we are out and about as I am forever engaging in dialogue. Admittedly I am partially to blame as I choose to engage, but there is evidence of a kind of conversational magnetism.

Often in delivering training there is a “listening skills” component. Talk turns to techniques, tips, tricks and blocks to listening (summarised here). The more I reflect on this, the more I come back to the same basic thoughts. In order to listen, you need to be present. (That’s present in the sense of paying attention in the moment. It’s not present as in the opposite of absent.)

Practicing good listening is – almost? – an art. You don’t “do” art, you “be” it. For some, it’s a lost art. For others, they have yet to discover its value.

So – for the record – here’s my listening checklist:

A) Choose to listen. (Be open to receiving. Stop broadcasting for a wee while.)

B) Prepare yourself. (Crank up your presence in the moment.)

C) “Be” a listener. (Silence, reflection, pause before responding.)

Now go on, give someone a proper listening to…

“Being listened to is so close to being loved that most people cannot tell the difference.”
David Augsberger

Ian-Beer - Blue sky Performance Improvement Ian Beer

www.blue-sky.co.uk

Asking questions as a creative habit

August 20, 2013 by

Abraham Lincoln

“The trouble with quotes on the internet is that you never know if they are genuine.”
Abraham Lincoln

Being a bit, well, old I can remember when research exclusively meant having to physically go to a library and read stuff. And when I say read, I mean really read. You’d ask librarians, speak to subject matter experts and whittle it down yourself to a few key titles if possible. Then you’d be alone: scouring the contents pages looking for the right chapters.  Essentially it was a whole lot of reading. Then the world changed.

Behold the internet!

Often we fail to recognise how it has made stuff quicker and simpler. Now we don’t even have to read because a subject matter expert has made a video. When it comes to DIY it’s possible to “get good” at any number of things because one can watch a VideoJug or YouTube expert showing you how.

Of course, quicker and simpler isn’t always better.

As my induction to Blue Sky Performance Improvement rattles along I find an increasing need to up my understanding on various topics. This has become a curious hotchpotch of t’interweb (video or otherwise), reading actual books, working with subject matter experts and getting coached. It’s underpinned by plain ol’ fashioned questions.

Then it occurred to me that I was experiencing blended learning. Now this has me reflecting not only on the shortcomings of each method in isolation, but of my own disappointingly lazy tendencies for finding evidence to fit the crime (so to speak). So as adoring of the web as I am, my level of trust in myself needs to be policed. I am staying honest and tempering my rampant enthusiasm by one simple question.
Is that true?

Is that cynicism? Nope, it’s pragmatism dear reader. The hopeless romantic in me would love to think that everything published out there in the Cloud was good and true. Then I read about Professor Hal Gregersen at INSEAD who positively relishes asking questions of what is presented to him. Like him I now find myself helping reshape and refine existing materials, practices and processes because questions have been asked. This feels good. This adds value. So now I modify my approach.

So what if that was true?

Now we have joyously disruptive conversations around here that test current thinking and move us ahead. How very refreshing.

Abe Lincoln would be proud…

Ian-Beer - Blue sky Performance Improvementwww.blue-sky.co.uk

“If I Had More Time I Would Write a Shorter Letter”

August 7, 2013 by

Simplicity & Sophistication.

There’s much debate over who this quote is actually attributed to. On this occasion, let’s credit Mark Twain. More here. No matter, it’s a theme that fascinates me. (It’s also a rich vein for irony as any expansion on the topic surely invites ridicule. Note to self: Use the KISS principle in blogs.)

Recently joining Blue Sky I am learning all the time about us: as people and The Blue Sky Way. Then there are our many wonderful clients and projects. Have you seen our case studies?! It’s really rather exciting! And yet really rather overwhelming when you’re new. My poor, overloaded Welsh brain is imploring folk to provide summaries, headlines, priorities and snapshots because it can’t make sense of it all.

This is where the fun starts.

You see, when you are so very deeply connected with a job/project/idea, to pull back and give someone a simple oversight is surprisingly challenging. It’s all too easy to brain dump and give all the detail in briefing a colleague. How so? This is human nature on several fronts: our professionalism, our intelligence, our thoroughness, our knowledge, our expertise all jostle for position.

Yet such detail is not always helpful to the new guy/gal. Not at first. So how do you do this in a manner that gets the newbie up to speed with maximum efficiency? Time to efficiency is a concept all of us have some interest in at work. (Although when you Google it I was rather surprised to see searches around Viagra as a top hit!) How long before you’re going to be truly effective?

Not that one can exist on a diet solely of sketches, helicopter views and big pictures you understand. Yet to prioritise, one must get a handle on the themes at play and then seek out the detail. It came to me in a flash: I need people to pitch to me so that I can buy what they are talking about.

At times like these I turn to Dan Pink. In his corking read “To Sell is Human” he postulates that we need to practice six pitches to get on.  Here’s the first one:

http://vimeo.com/66508882

On a note closer to home, I’ve had success with asking “how would you explain this to my maiden aunt?” Then I get a non-technical, jargon free, plain English overview for what’s going on. It works wonders. Why? Because then I’m curious: then I want to know what’s going on behind the scenes.

Da Vinci said it before, I’ll say I again:

“Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.”

Ian-Beer - Blue sky Performance Improvementhttp://www.blue-sky.co.uk

When was the last time you tried something new?

July 30, 2013 by

“The secret to getting ahead is getting started. The secret of getting started is breaking your complex overwhelming tasks into manageable tasks and then starting on the first one.”

So said Mark Twain and as my first month with Blue Sky ends I am moved to write on the topic.

Ask yourself: when was the last time you started something new? I mean, properly new? For me – professionally – it’s been not far short of a decade. Add in not getting any younger and the whole shift from comfort zone to discomfort zone is a fascinating one to reflect on.

Consider this: you get home to find your nearest and dearest half way through a movie. You sit down to watch. It’s awkward to interrupt, to ask what’s happened so far, you’re not sure what’s going on and the plot is a little bit of a mystery. Familiar? Well, it’s like that changing to a new role only more so. It’s frustrating not knowing who the main characters are and what they represent. It’s maddening not knowing what’s important and what’s inconsequential.

Unlike that movie though, with a new role it’s okay to ask. It’s okay to press pause, to ask “what just happened?” Of course, it’s not a movie, not a recording. It’s more like live TV and the cameras are trained on you!

It’s only when you make a personal change like this that you realise how all-consuming it is. You’re surprisingly tired, you’re more easily confused and you’re blessed (?!) with excess information. Add to that your desire to make it work and professional pride, or in my case, sheer stubbornness. It is oh-so-difficult to remember to step back such is the onslaught. Particularly as you’ve trained yourself in being really, really good at your last job.

Luckily, the folk around here are not just great to be around, but also rather excellent at this change stuff. I know I’m in good hands, I just need to let them help me!

So I’ll be focused on prioritising and keeping it simple. After all, Leonardo Da Vinci told us “simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” If I allow myself a moment to stand back, I think I know what he was getting at…

Ian-Beer - Blue sky Performance Improvementwww.blue-sky.co.uk

Bringing the complexities of the human brain to the masses

July 25, 2013 by

I don’t know about you, but I start to read numerous articles each week, but in truth, actually finish reading only a small proportion. I’ve been wondering why that might be.

I think many open with statements that immediately make me feel like I’ll need to commit to a considerable journey of exploration with a resulting output, that in truth, is likely to leave me none the wiser.

Confronted with complex questions, theories, models, mnemonics, tinged with an inordinate amount of academic references and unpronounceable words, the outcome tends to be the same. “Hmmm, haven’t I got work to do?”

Now, whilst I’m no Stephen Hawking, I’m certainly no slouch so surely if I find much of this stuff heavy going, intimidating even, there must be others like me, no?

I want to read articles that engage me immediately. Things I can identify with and understand without reaching for a thesaurus, something that hints at what’s in store and lures me in with tantalising titles, offering me a little “try before you buy”. Essentially, I want a mini-break before committing to the fortnight’s holiday.

Well, I fairly recently discovered Daniel Goleman and have found his articles an absolute breath of fresh air. Whether skimming the surface or a mere flirtation with the topic, he has a way of keeping it simple whilst offering links which will take me on the deeper journey, if and when I decide I’m ready. Whether it be Evaluating your own Emotional Intelligence with the starting point being asking myself 9 very straightforward questions or exploring the Five Key Steps to Habit Change, he does enough to engage my thinking swiftly.

Seriously, who could resist an article entitled Maximize your “Aha!” Moment Before I know it, I’m there, bags packed and heading off on a journey to who knows where.

Now, I wouldn’t want anyone to think that this is over simplified nonsense. Trust me, with his Ph.D. from Harvard, for those interested, there’s enough references to Freud and gamma activity to keep even the purists happy.  I think he succeeds where others struggle, in bringing the complexities of the human brain to the masses.

Miranda-Cain---Blue-Sky-Performance-Improvement   Mirandaatbluesky

Blue Sky Performance Improvement Logo - High Resolution

Schools not out forever!

July 4, 2013 by

I am Eloise Welch and I am a GCSE student in year 10. I have been lucky enough to do a week’s work experience with Blue Sky. I have gained an insight into how business’ work and the skills you need. One subject I do at school is psychology.

One of the topics we do in psychology is memory and how the memory works. A theory that has been proven is that if you teach someone something you are trying to learn, you are more likely to remember it. An example of this is when I am trying to revise my school subjects e.g. PE, I talk to my mum about the bones and muscles I have to learn, basically teaching her the information.

I think this results in the information sticking in your head because you have to really think about what you are saying when explaining it to someone else. This is relevant to Blue Sky because it forms part of their Embedded Learning Methodology and helps clients to learn, to make sure that they understand and remember the information.

I love psychology and was really pleased to see a connection between what I am learning at school and how Blue Sky use this as part of their work. Maybe there isn’t such a difference between school and work after all.

Happy Smile - Energise - Blue Sky Performance Improvement     www.blue-sky.co.uk

Follow The Leader…

June 26, 2013 by

I was asked a question by a client this week – “Why don’t my staff just do as they are told?” He had had a frustrating day, been away for a week and it had all gone wrong.  No member of his staff has taken responsibility for getting things done.  So why is it that his staff will not do as they are told?

This is a common question that many managers ask themselves and invariably the answers are similar; staff are lazy, they do not have the knowledge or skills, they are unmotivated, they just don’t care, they have a poor attitude.

Can you see the problem with these answers?  All of the answers indicate that the problem is with the other person (the ‘staff’ in this case).  It’s their fault, and you now have plenty of reasons why; however this does not resolve the problem and their behaviour will continue.  After all, you have abdicated responsibility back to them!

How would it be if instead, you asked yourself up to 3 different questions?

  • “Why should anyone be led by me?”

Notice the different answers – because they feel inspired, motivated, valued, trusted and respected.

  • “What have I done to ensure my staff feel inspired, motivated, valued, trusted and respected?”
  • “What else can I do to make my staff feel inspired, motivated, valued, trusted and respected?”

Notice the difference emphasis in the answers. Your focus is now on what you can do, not relying on others. You are taking responsibility for action. That’s what good leaders do. Do you get wrapped up in reasons and excuses, or do you focus on what you can do to make it happen?

Steve_Shave

www.blue-sky.co.uk

Steve@Bluesky